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Artists and Humanitarians come together to Create a Human Rights Pop-Up Museum in DC for International Day of Peace

YHRI National Director, Erica Rodgers speaking on the vital necessity of human rights education in today's political climate.

Public watching a video as part of the human rights museum exhibit.

Peace Lights projected onto the front of the Church of Scientology's building in celebration of the occasion.

Youth for Human Rights International created an interactive Pop-up Museum in Washington DC to celebrate the International Day of Peace.

A more peaceful society will only happen when all people treat one another with the respect and decency listed out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights”
— Erica Rodgers
WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, UNITED STATES, October 4, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) created an interactive Pop-up Museum in Washington DC to celebrate the International Day of Peace. The Museum showcased the history of human rights and celebrated the upcoming 70th anniversary of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The museum also included student artwork from around the world as well as artwork from famous Ethiopian painter, Alemayhou Gebremedhin. The artwork displayed the United Nations’ theme of human rights and the right to peace. Additionally, Peace Lights, an increasingly recognized international symbol of peace, played as visitors entered the Museum and were projected as a colorful light show onto the front of the building in the evening.

Erica Rodgers, the National Director of Youth for Human Rights International and organizer of the event said, “We wanted to create a museum that showcased beautiful artwork in addition to walking people through each one of the fundamental human rights in a way that allowed people to connect with not only what human rights are but how they relate to them personally.” This one day Pop-Up Museum remained busy throughout the day as people came to tour the series of exhibits spanning over ten-thousand square feet. “Understanding Human Rights in today’s political climate is vital. A more peaceful society will only happen when all people treat one another with the respect and decency listed out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” commented Ms. Rodgers.

The museum was hosted by The Founding Church of Scientology at 1424 16th St. NW, Washington DC as the Church supports for Youth for Human Rights International’s initiative of broad human rights education in the community. When asked, “Why do Scientologists care so much about human rights?”, representative of the Church, Sylvia Stanard, had this to say: “Protecting the basic human rights of all people has been a part of the Church of Scientology’s core values since its founding in 1954. L Ron Hubbard was a humanitarian and firm supporter of Human Rights as listed in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1969 he issued a directive to all of the staff of Churches of Scientology around the world that "Human Rights must be made a fact, not an idealistic dream". Therefore as a natural result; the Church of Scientology sponsors human rights campaigns such as Youth for Human Rights International to help fulfill Mr. Hubbard's vision of a better world where human rights are a living reality.”

The museum also served as a venue for a special panel discussion on peace including talks by several speakers on various efforts aimed at expanding human rights education worldwide. Speakers included notable human rights activists such as Sameena Nazir from Networks for Change and Saber Rock, a former Afghan Interpreter for the US Marines in Afghanistan. Mr. Rock, despite being kidnapped and tortured by the Taliban, uses his experience to fuel his drive to bring human rights and peace based education to his country in Afghanistan. Heather Hill, Chair of the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations Association National Capital Area chapter summarized the theme of the event perfectly when she said, “Human rights are global. They matter in the farthest place you can imagine and they matter equally here, in our own country, our own cities, our own neighborhoods--and in our very houses, beds, and bodies. The work we do to promote human rights must be as much done locally as it must be done anywhere.”


About Youth for Human Rights:

Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become valuable advocates for tolerance and peace. YHRI teaches human rights education both in the classroom and in nontraditional educational settings such a through art series, concerts and other interactive community events. Their most recent campaign has included #KnowYour30 with the deliberate purpose of increasing awareness of the 30 human rights every person has and how they are a part of everyday life. To learn more go to https://www.youthforhumanrights.org or watch a documentary on how Youth for Human Rights began by going to www.scientology.tv

Contact:
Youth for Human Rights International - National Office
202-667-6404
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